The effects of binge drinking are both physical and mental. Likewise, the effects of binge drinking are both short-term and long-term. In other words, when binge drinking, you have more to worry about than that hangover you are going to have the next day!

Binge drinking is when males drink five drinks or more in two hours, and females drink at least four drinks in two hours. Binge drinking puts your health and safety at risk. The liver can only break down about one drink in an hour. Therefore, binge drinking can be very dangerous and affect your body in extremely negative ways.

Short-Term Effects of Binge Drinking

Since the liver can only process about one drink per hour, any more than that will go straight into the blood system. When your blood alcohol content (BAC) increases, so will the effects on your body and brain. Many other factors also play a part in your blood alcohol content. How quickly you drink the alcoholic drinks and whether you have eaten affects your BAC. In fact, how much you have eaten during the day also has a bearing on the blood alcohol content.

Other short-term side effects of binge drinking may include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Blackouts
  • Falls and other injuries
  • Arrests and charges from driving under the influence of alcohol
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Unwanted pregnancies
  • Sexual assault

Even worse, binge drinking can also render fatal consequences such as alcohol poisoning, fatal car crashes, drownings, or criminal behaviors. Any number of things can go wrong in your life from only one night of binge drinking.

What are the Long-Term Effects of Binge Drinking?

Binge drinking as a regular habit can be a sign of alcohol use disorder (AUD). According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH), Problem drinking that becomes severe is given the medical diagnosis of “alcohol use disorder” or AUD.” Alcohol use disorder is indicated when a person has a compulsive alcohol use along with a loss of control over how much they drink.

Long-term effects of binge drinking may include:

  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Suppressed immune system
  • Depression
  • Seizures
  • High blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Liver disease
  • Dementia
  • Anemia

If your binge drinking has developed into alcohol use disorder, you may give up typically enjoyed activities to drink instead or experience cravings when not drinking. Furthermore, you may have lost a job because of drinking alcohol. If binge drinking is now a pattern in your life, you more than likely are struggling with alcohol use disorder.

Help for Alcohol Use Disorder

If you have an alcohol use disorder or if you suspect that a loved one may be struggling with this, seek help at an inpatient addiction treatment facility.  Inpatient treatment will take you away from the temptation to use alcohol during your treatment because these facilities are alcohol-free and drug-free. You can focus on your counseling and treatment program without thinking about ways to obtain some alcohol.

At New Beginnings Rehab Center, if you need detoxification to remove the toxins from your body, you will have supervision around the clock as you go through the process. You will always have a staff member available should any medical issues arise. After detox, you will be ready to start your treatment program that we will design to fit your individual needs and preferences.

Contact one of our informed representatives at New Beginnings Rehab Center to learn more about our facility and the many treatment programs that we offer. They can answer any questions you may have. Contact us now!

 

Sources:

Niaaa.nih.gov – Alcohol Use Disorder